Music review: Frank Ocean’s ‘Channel Orange’

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When Frank Ocean addressed speculation about his sexuality last week, the declaration on his Tumblr page felt lyrical. "Time would glide," the R&B singer wrote, eloquently transporting us a few summers back to when he met his first love — a man.


It was a first for R&B, too. For decades, no other genre of American pop music has chronicled heterosexual love in greater detail. Suddenly, Ocean had become the first mainstream R&B artist to go public about a romance that previous generations would have fiercely fought to conceal.








(Courtesy of Def Jam) - Cover art for Frank Ocean's album ‘Channel Orange’ (Courtesy of Def Jam)




Video


The Washington Post’s pop music critic, Chris Richards, talks about the buzz being generated around Frank Ocean and the early release of his debut album Channel Orange. Find out which tracks stood out.

The Washington Post's pop music critic, Chris Richards, talks about the buzz being generated around Frank Ocean and the early release of his debut album Channel Orange. Find out which tracks stood out.





But the urban music community — not always known for its gay-friendly attitudes — has largely rallied around Ocean this week while detractors ducked into social media's digital bathroom stalls to scrawl their ugliness.


But overall, Ocean's announcement has been greeted with a support that's beginning to feel emblematic of the country's changing attitudes about homosexuality.


Then on Tuesday, another surprise — the Los Angeles singer's major-label debut album "Channel Orange" would be available on iTunes a week before it was scheduled to land in stores. After a few listens, it feels as if it landed years ahead of time.


At 24, Ocean shows a sure-footed confidence that took many of his forebears years to summon. But his songwriting chops shouldn't surprise anyone who's been following this guy's young career. He released a lovely digital album last year, "Nostalgia, Ultra"; he's helped pen songs for Justin Bieber, John Legend and Beyonce; he sang the most exquisite hook on Kanye West and Jay-Z's 2011 collaboration album "Watch the Throne"; and he's made standout contributions as a member of the rowdy Los Angeles rap collective
Source : washingtonpost.com

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